DeROSE Method workshop at WeWork

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This week we were invited to the WeWork 11 Park Place location to discuss how breathing better enhances quality of life and optimizes performance of the body, emotions and brain.

Studies by Jack Feldman, professor of neurology at UCLA, and later by Mark Krasnow and Kevin Yackle are a few of many showing that breathing affects the mind and emotional states. They found a neural circuit correlating accelerated breathe to hyper-arousal, and vice-versa.

When our breath accelerates, our body's internal rhythm speeds up, making us more alert and reactive. This is an expected automatic & physiological response that prepares us to withstand a challenge perceived to demand more energy than what is readily available, compared to a more secure and undisturbed situation. An acceleration or deceleration is neither inherently good or bad. The most important lesson to take from this is to understand how to activate these states at your convenience. It's all about harnessing these responses to get the results you consider ideal.

The DeROSE Method teaches a collection of more than 50 respiratory techniques that produce a powerful impact on mind’s ability to function better, in addition to an increase in energy levels of the practitioner.

Breathing more intelligently and strategically in your daily life will positively affect your brain, emotional and physical activity. With an increased emotional intelligence, a better focus and more mental resilience you will perform better at work, realizing your potential.

What does it mean to breathe intelligently and strategically?

It starts by breathing exclusively through the nose in order to properly filter, moisten the air and optimize the temperature of the air before it reaches the lungs.

Second, is the importance of using optimal lung capacity. For this, you need to utilize the lower, middle and upper sections of the lungs. The lower section of the lungs is responsible for more than 50% of our lung capacity alone, yet any people neglect deep breathing, leading to a decline in lung function which has been linked to high blood pressure, anxiety, shortness of breathe and even heart disease. We often start people off training with abdominal deep breathing to re-educate their respiratory system to utilize the lower section of the lungs.

When we don't utilize the three sections of the lungs, primarily the lower section, we capture less oxygen, thus our body and cells also receive less oxygen, forcing our heart to work harder to pump oxygen throughout the body. The heart working overtime long-term can lead to heart failure. Earlier symptoms of reduced lung capacity include shortness of breath, decreased stamina, reduced endurance and frequent respiratory infections.

 We separate lung capacity into three sections for didactic purposes. Each section is associated to unique movements during breathe. Take inhalation, for example: inhale into the lower section and the abdomen will expand outward, then inhale into the middle section and the ribcage will expand/dilate, and finally, inhale into the upper section and the upper chest will expand/rise.

We separate lung capacity into three sections for didactic purposes. Each section is associated to unique movements during breathe. Take inhalation, for example: inhale into the lower section and the abdomen will expand outward, then inhale into the middle section and the ribcage will expand/dilate, and finally, inhale into the upper section and the upper chest will expand/rise.

We'll continue this post next week so stay connected!